Untitled

Home About SCD

How to Do SCD

Supplements

Probiotics

SCD Science Counselors Yogurt Links Support
Search & Site Map SCD Information Enhanced SCD Allowed Foods

Recipes

 

Discovering the Amazing Power of the SCD Goat Yogurt

Goat Yogurt



Children with autism improve dramatically with the SCD goat yogurt! Improvements are seen in digestion,speech and behavior. The yogurt making process changes the structure of the casein and renders it harmless. Most children do tolerate the goat yogurt if it done the right way by starting out with a tiny amount and gradually increasing the amount. There is no risk in trying since the casein leaves the body after several days.

Topics:

Parents' Testimonials about the SCD Goat Yogurt
Quote from Dr Baker's book about safety of yogurt for ASD children.
Scientific Article about the Benefits of Yogurt
FAQ for Goat Yogurt
Goat vs. Cow yogurt
Yogurt vs. Probiotics
Goat Milk brands
Goat Yogurt Starter
Making SCD™ Yogurt
Making SCD™ Yogurt - Pictorial Guide






Parents' testimonials about the yogurt.

I have had my two boys on SCD for just about two years. My older child, 7, had an ASD diagnosis; he is now considered recovered although he still has some difficulties with attention and sound sensitivity. But he continues to get better, not worse, and I quit worrying about those elusive peptides a long time ago. My younger child, 5, is NT with some form of colitis that has been difficult to control. I added goat yogurt 21 months ago. Both boys have done fine on it, and about 18 months ago I added back cheese too. I think my younger son is still sensitive to cow products so I try to give my kids only goat-milk and sheep-milk cheese.

What initially convinced me to try the goat-milk yogurt were several things:
1)there were some moms on the list with VERY sensitive kids, MUCH more sensitive than mine, and they reported their kids were doing fine with goat yogurt. There used to be a list-member named Jen Young, and her son Colin was so sensitive that he would bang his head if she used the wrong starter. Anyway, he did fine on goat-milk yogurt - in fact she said he could tolerate many more foods when he was eating yogurt.

(2)Dr. William Shaw gave a talk at an ACAM conference, and he discussed the fact that beta-casomorphine, which is probably the problem peptide, exists in some but not all cow milk and not at all in goat milk; and (3) there are a number of studies showing that probiotics are delivered much more effectively in fermented foods than in capsules.

My kids ate GFCF for 2 years before I put them on SCD, so I too was very nervous about giving them yogurt. But I got brave and tried it, and nothing bad happened! My yogurt maker runs most days of the week and my kids get a dish every day for breakfast. As I said, this has gone on for 21 months now.

Catherine

More comments from Catherine Tamaro:

Here is something interesting about dairy: There is increasing evidence that the kids with autism are not methylating properly, and one of the effects is that they're not recycling homocysteine back into methionine. That means they're short on methionine, which is the building block for, among other things, glutathione. Yogurt is a great source of methionine.

Thus the GFCF people do even more harm by forbidding dairy - they leave the kids short of a very essential amino acid.

Catherine

Comments by Jen Young:

Welcome. I was you in March of 2001. I had the same concerns and was trying to combine the GFCF and SCD for many months.
Let me tell you my son does horrible* on cow's milk of any kind. But I knew he needed the homemade yoghurt to heal. This is why I tried goat's milk and goat yogurt starter. And my son does WONDERFULLY on it--if it is pure goat yogurt (for starter) with nothing added but the three legal bacteria This yoghurt is different than the one you buy in the store---we cook or ferment it for 24 hours to get rid of most of the lactose.
I have never taken the peptide test. I am a bit suspicious and rebellious in some regards. My theory was that I didn't care WHAT was leaking necessarily--but wanted to fix the leak. I refused to do all the DAN/gfcf tests and when the holistic/natural healing path instead. The SCD is all we've used so far and my son is no longer autistic.
However, let me tell you--he made the best* progress on the diet when he was on the yoghurt. During the six months he was off (we lost our goat source) none of the probiotics adhered to his intestines and he had some rough times. The yoghurt is such a savior.
Best,
Jen and Colin (SCD, April 2001)

We too came to SCD dairy free. And full of casein fears. I learned that after 24 hours of fermentation that the casein is denatured.

I am so glad that I put aside my fears of casein and dairy. After that first die off....using Elaine approved yogurt. Made with SCD safe starter. This is when we began to see the miracle happen with our ASD/celiac daughter...and all of us. She has a ways to go, but I will never fear the use of this yogurt again. SCD as outlined in the book is truly working to heal all of us.

Antoinette



Back to topics



Quote from Dr Baker's book about safety of yogurt for ASD children.


In Dr. Baker and Dr. Pangborn's biomed book, Autism: Effective Biomedical Treatments (Have We Done Everything We Can For This Child? Individuality In An Epidemic), there is a section by Judy Gorman on SCD. She says that not one of the people in her group had problems when they added in the yogurt.



Back to topics


Scientific Article about the Benefits of Yogurt


The following scientific paper discusses the amazing health benefits of yogurt:
Adolfsson O, Meydani SN, Russell RM. Yogurt and gut function. 1: Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Aug;80(2):245-56.
View this article

This article also contains information about how the casein in yogurt is predigested by the lactic bacteria and is therefore different from the casein found in milk.
In the "Protein" section of this article, the following statements were made:
"It has been argued that protein from yogurt is more easily digested than is protein from milk, as bacterial predigestion of milk proteins in yogurt may occur"

"During fermentation, both heat treatment and acid production result in finer coagulation of casein, which may also contribute to the greater protein digestibility of yogurt than of milk." .



Back to topics



FAQ for Goat Yogurt.


When am I ready to start the yogurt?

When the initial die off reaction to SCD has subsided and things are stable so that you can gauge the reaction to the yogurt. Children with severe sensitivity to dairy might need to wait a few months before introducing the yogurt.

What dose should I give?

For a child who is very sensitive to dairy,you should start out with less than a 1/8 of a teaspoon. There is a huge difference between a 1/8 of a teaspoon and a 1/4 of a teaspoon. Some children will not tolerate 1/4 of a teaspoon but will do fine with a 1/8 of a teaspoon. Try to remember that the yogurt is a powerful medication and should be introduced very gradually. Some children will not tolerate any amount. For those children it might be better to wait a few more months.

Is it risky to try the goat yogurt?

The good news about goat milk yogurt is that it is not risky to try it as long as you start out with a small dose. If your child does not tolerate the goat yogurt, the bad reactions to the goat yogurt will disappear a week after discontinuing the yogurt. This is due to the fact that dairy peptides (from casein) leave the body in about 2-4 days.

DAN practitioner,Pam Ferro,also observed this phenomena with the children in her clinic.

If my child's Gi problems do not resolve after a few months,can I try the yogurt?

There has been a small number of children who did not improve with dairy free SCD and needed the yogurt to get gut/brain healing.
Is there die off reaction from the goat yogurt?

Sometimes,there is an initial bad reaction to the goat yogurt. If you get those reactions,proceed very slowly and decrease the amount of yogurt. If the initial bad reaction lasts more than a month,then discontinue the yogurt and try it at a later time.

What are the symptoms of a die off reaction to the yogurt?

Runny nose, irritability, anger and worsening GI problems are some of the die off symptoms that have been reported after introducing the yogurt.

The decision whether to continue depends on the individual case. a very runny nose is OK for a child who is doing a private at home ABA program but not OK for a young adult going for job interviews. Make sure that the die off reaction does not risk your child's health, monitor the situation vary carefully.

How long does the bad reaction last?

It usually stops after about a month but on rare occasions it may last for several months.

How can I distinguish between a die off reaction and intolerance to the yogurt?.

Take some SCD goat yogurt and freeze it. Freezing will kill the beneficial probiotic lactic acid bacteria. Give your child a small amount of frozen yogurt - a dose equal to the amount of fresh yogurt that you are giving him. If your child tolerates it, then it is not the dairy that is bothering him but the probiotics inside the yogurt.

A die off reaction will bring quick improvements in speech and other neurological symptoms for a small child,as well as GI symptoms.

Observe carefully for GI improvements. Video your child,before and after to assess behavioral improvements.

If you have any problems please seek the help of a SCD counselor.

Is Cow yogurt OK?

Cow yogurt is SCD legal for people who do not have autism nor cow milk allergy. We have heard that a small amount of children with ASD do tolerate it but many others do not. At this point we do not have enough information to recommend it. We advise caution.

Organic milk makes a more powerful yogurt.

What other strategies help to tolerate the yogurt?

Some parents use the enzyme, Peptizide by Houston. One list member reported that she tolerated yogurt made with 2% goat milk better than the yogurt made from regular goat milk. Dripping the yogurt can make it more tolerable:

The traditional way to drip the yogurt:
http://uclbs.org/recipes/dairy/suegoatcheese.php

The easy way to drip the yogurt:
http://www.digestivewellness.com/itempage-1048-24-13-1584.html

Yogurt and Oxalates
There is scientific proof that dairy lowers oxalate values and the risk of kidney stones. The SCD yogurt is a wonderful source of calcium and most of the children with autism can tolerate it after several months of SCD.

http://www.hbci.com/~wenonah/new/kidstone.htm

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/short/346/2/77



Back to topics










Goat vs. Cow Yogurt

Goat Milk Composition
(from www.dgc.co.nz/about.html)

For hundreds of years, goat milk has been regarded as the closest milk to human milk. While at the gross compositional level the amount of fat and protein is similar to that in cow milk, there are significant differences between the types of fat, protein and minor components present. When compared with cow milk, goat milk is considered to provide advantages due to the following factors:
  • The fat in goat milk is in smaller globules. Smaller fat globules provide a greater surface area for enzymes to break down the particles, enabling easier digestion. In addition, goat milk lacks 'agglutinin', a factor present in cow milk that makes fat globules in milk clump together.
  • Goat milk fat contains a significantly greater proportion of short and medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) than cow milk fat, which contributes to more rapid digestion. Goat milk is higher in caproic (C6), caprylic (C8), capric (C10), which total 16% in goat milk (compared with 7% in cow milk). They have been used to treat malabsorption symptoms, intestinal disorders, premature infant feeding etc.
  • Goat milk forms smaller, softer, more easily digested curds in the infant stomach, which eases the digestive process. Goat milk, due to absence or low levels of alpha-s1-casein, produces curds that are weaker and less firm than cow milk.
  • Goat milk has better buffering capacity than cow milk at the pH-temperature conditions that exist in the stomach. This can be very useful for those with gastric ulcers. Goat milk contains bio-active factors such as insulin-like growth factor.
The Process of Making Yogurt Changes the Casein
From Elaine Gottschall:

When we make yogurt and the pH falls to about 4.5 rather than 7.1-2 (as in fluid milk), the proteins are denatured which means that because of the acidity, the proteins lose their 3 dimensional structure (sterochemistry) which would be the reason allergists worry about casein. In yogurt and in the natural cheeses, the casein is denatured into a two-dimensional structure which would be less likely to cause allergic reactions.

Back to topics


Yogurt vs. Probiotics

Coming soon!

Back to topics


Goat Milk Brands


To look for local sources of fresh goat's milk: Real Milk


Back to topics


Goat Yogurt Starter

A non-dairy yogurt starter can be purchased from GI ProHealth.

Back to topics


Making SCD™ Yogurt

Making yogurt in a Yogurt Maker

A dehydrator is the best machine for controlling the temperature of the yogurt. Other yogurt makers may overheat but this can be corrected with a light dimmer.
Click here for information on how to use the light dimmer and for additional information on dehydrators.

1.) Put one or two liters (quarts) of milk into a clean pot and heat slowly on a medium heat until the temperature reaches 180 degrees F.* Stir the milk from time to time to keep the bottom from scorching, and again before you take a final temp reading to make sure that the entire contents have reached 180 degrees. The purpose in heating the milk to this temperature is to kill any bacteria that might be present and interfere with the yogurt making culture.

*Goat milk is delicate and should not be heated above 185 degrees F.

2.) Turn the heat off and allow the milk to cool. The heated milk needs to be cooled to ROOM TEMPERATURE or below (as per Elaine's yogurt making instructions in BTVC). The range for room temperature is 2025 C (64-77 F). Stir well before determining the final temperature. You may cover the pot with a clean tea towel while it cools.

( Pour the milk through a little sieve into the yogurt maker insert, to remove the film that forms on the top of the milk as it cools. You do not have to, but it will make for smoother yogurt.)

3.) Add 1/8 tsp (1 quart) or 1/4 tsp (2 quarts) of ProGurt yogurt starter from GI ProHealth to several tablespoons of the milk and mix it well until it seems well dissolved. Then add about half a cup more of the milk, mix well, and pour all of that back into the milk in the yogurt container. Again, mix it well. Put the lid onto the yogurt maker insert, making sure it is secure.

4.) Fill the outer container of the yogurt machine with warm water to the appropriate mark (i.e. for 1 liter or 2 liters or as instructed for individual cup yogurt makers.)

Then, put the yogurt maker liner, containing your milk and yogurt culture into the machine - in some models, it may feel as if it is floating in the water slightly. This is fine. Put the top of the yogurt maker on, plug it in to ferment for at least 24 hours. Some commercial yogurt makers may overheat, especially after 6-8 hours. If this occurs you can try venting the lid, turning off the yogurt maker until the temperature lowers and then turning it back on or placing the yogurt maker on a rack to prevent overheating.

5.) After at least 24 hours, unplug the machine and remove the inner container. Carefully, (remember - it's ALIVE), put the container into the fridge and let it rest for about 8 hours until it has cooled.

6.) Gently but thoroughly, stir the yogurt with a spoon or metal whisk to make it smooth. If you stir it too much it can separate, so remember to treat it gently.


Making SCD Yogurt in the Oven

Follow steps 1 and 2 for making yogurt in a yogurt maker.

3.) In a separate bowl, place 1/8 tsp (1 quart) or 1/4 tsp (2 quarts) of ProGurt yogurt starter and slowly add some of the cooled milk, mixing it well with a whisk or electric hand mixer. When this solution is blended well, add it slowly back into the pot, again mixing it well.

4.) Place the covered pot in oven with a 60 watt light bulb on. Keep a thermometer in the oven and maintain the temperature at 100 to 110 degrees F. If the oven becomes too warm, use a pen to prop open the door just a bit. Once you have done this a few times, you will get a feel for how your oven best maintains this temperature. Ferment the yogurt this way for 24 hours.

5.) After 24 hours, remove the pot from the oven and put it in the fridge for about 8 hours. Do not disturb the yogurt until it is set up properly, or you will change the consistency.

6.) Gently but thoroughly, stir the yogurt with a spoon or metal whisk to make it smooth.

The cultures will remain active for about 2 weeks if properly refrigerated.

Details about cooling the milk to room temperature before adding yogurt starter:

1.Yogurt starter should be kept refrigerated or in freezer (as per your starter's instructions). If the bacteria in the yogurt starter are added at too high a temperature they can go into thermal shock and be damaged or die. Since we need to ferment the milk fully you want to start with a full batch of healthy, lively bacteria. When the milk is cooled to room temperature it allows them to gradually acclimatize to the temperature change. (It is similar to when you are adding a new pet fish to your fish tank. You place the bag with the fish in the tank to allow the water temperatures to even out and when they are the same you let the fish out of the bag.).

2. Some of the bacteria in the yogurt starters have fairly low, optimum growth ranges. Lactobacillus casei, one of the strains in Progurt, has a low temperature range. Cooling the milk to room temperature before adding this starter will allow the L. casei to do it's part in fermenting the milk into yogurt.

3. Commercial yogurt making and the usual recipes for making yogurt differ from the SCD 24-hour yogurt recipe. We need all of the bacteria to survive for the 24-hour period. Commercial and home yogurt recipes generally ferment the milk for only 4-8 hours. If they kill off some of the bacteria because of higher cool temperatures it won't matter, as they don't want a fully fermented yogurt (a fully fermented yogurt is more acidic and tart). They ferment the milk long enough for the milk to "set up" and if a few bacteria were killed initially they'd still have enough to cause coagulation (the gelling of the milk). For commercial makers of yogurt it saves them time and money to only cool to ~108F; it means they can produce many more batches of yogurt and make more money. The SCD yogurt takes longer but the 24-hour fermentation period provides SCD yogurt with extremely high numbers of good bacteria.



Back to topics



Making SCD™ Yogurt -Pictorial Guide


Put one or two liters (quarts) of milk into a clean pot.

Stir the milk from time to time to keep the bottom from scorching, and again before you take a final temp reading to make sure that the entire contents have reached 180 degrees.
The purpose in heating the milk to this temperature is to kill any bacteria that might be present and interfere with the yogurt making culture.

Heat slowly on a medium heat until the temperature reaches 180 degrees F. Goat milk is delicate and should not be heated above 185 degrees F.

Turn the heat off and allow the milk to cool. The heated milk needs to be cooled to ROOM TEMPERATURE or below (as per Elaine's yogurt making instructions in BTVC). The range for room temperature is 2025 C (64-77 F). You may cover the pot with a clean tea towel while it cools.

( Pour the milk through a little sieve into the yogurt maker insert, to remove the film that forms on the top of the milk as it cools. You do not have to, but it will make for smoother yogurt.)

Stir well before determining the final temperature.
. ProGurt Yogurt Starter

Add 1/8 tsp (1 quart) or 1/4 tsp (2 quarts) scoop of ProGurt yogurt starter from GI ProHealth to several tablespoons of the milk and mix it well until it seems well dissolved. Then add about half a cup more of the milk and mix well.

Pour the mixture back into the milk and mix it well.
Pour the mixture into the yogurt container. Put the lid onto the yogurt maker insert, making sure it is secure. Then, put the yogurt maker liner, containing your milk and yogurt culture into the machine - in some models, it may feel as if it is floating in the water slightly. This is fine. Put the top of the yogurt maker on, plug it in to ferment for at least 24 hours. Some commercial yogurt makers may overheat, especially after 6-8 hours. If this occurs you can try venting the lid, turning off the yogurt maker until the temperature lowers and then turning it back on or placing the yogurt maker on a rack to prevent overheating.

After at least 24 hours, unplug the machine and remove the inner container. Carefully, (remember - it's ALIVE), put the container into the fridge and let it rest for about 8 hours until it has cooled.

The cultures will remain active for about 2 weeks if properly refrigerated.



Back to topics

DISCLAIMER: This site is for informational purposes only.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE !
The contents of this site are copyrighted, all rights reserved, and may not be reproduced, electronically scanned
or downloaded, either in whole or in part, without written permission of the owner.